Mars One

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Mars One

Post by Jan on Tue Dec 03, 2013 7:03 pm

Humans on Mars in 2023

The Mars One Foundation is a not-for-profit organization that will establish a permanent human settlement on Mars.
A reliable surface habitat will be set up before the first crew lands; more settlers and cargo will follow every two years.
Our plan is realistic because the technology needed already exists and can be purchased from the private space industry.
The first footprint on Mars will fascinate and inspire generations; it is this public interest that will help finance this human mission to Mars. Join our global effort by sharing our vision with your friends, supporting us and perhaps becoming a Mars astronaut yourself.

Source: http://www.mars-one.com/en/

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Re: Mars One

Post by Jan on Tue Dec 03, 2013 7:07 pm


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Re: Mars One

Post by Jan on Tue Dec 03, 2013 7:12 pm

India's Mars Orbiter Has Left Earth And Is Headed Towards Mars


On November 5, India had a successful launch of its Mars Orbiter. Since that time, the Orbiter has been a tad misnamed – it’s actually been orbiting the Earth, using a series of timed rocket bursts and the assistance of Earth’s gravity to build up the speed it needs to get to Mars. Today, India’s space program has confirmed that the Mars Orbiter has left Earth’s orbit and is now on a trajectory that will take it to the Red Planet after a 10 month journey.

At about 12:49am local India time on December 1 (2:19pm EST November 30), scientists at the India Space Research Organization (ISRO) sent commands to the Mars Orbiter to fire its rockets for 22 minutes. That caused the spacecraft to significantly increase its speed and begin its long trip.

“Following the completion of this manoeuvre, the Earth orbiting phase of the spacecraft ended,” the organization said in a statement. “The spacecraft is now on a course to encounter Mars after a journey of about 10 months around the Sun.”

NASA’s Deep Space Network is providing ISRO with communications support for the probe, which has several different instruments to assist it in its mission to study Martian features, including a methane detector, a mass spectrometer, and different types of cameras.

One notable feature of the mission is its cost, which is incredibly low for this type of mission – when it’s all said and done, the total cost of the project is estimated to be about $69 million. The ability to complete such an ambitious mission at a low cost is something that commercial space proponents are keeping an eye on.

“India’s incredible strides in space exploration are a model for all of us who believe we can and should find the means to lower the cost of space exploration,” Jeffrey Manber, founder and Managing Director of space science company Nanoracks told me. “Not just in low earth orbit but even missions to other planets. Investments in space are essential for India to assure they have a voice in the future of both exploration and utilization of the space environment for domestic needs. It is a small price for the value realized.”

Despite the attention, the Mars Orbiter project is actually just a small part of India’s overall space program – but it may be an important one in keeping it going, according to Jeff Foust, a space industry analyst for Futron.

“It’s worth noting that the Indian space program (now about 50 years old) has long been focused on practical applications: communications, Earth imaging, weather forecasting, and so on,” he said. “Missions like this help show how far India’s space program have come and provide a point of pride for their program; also, it helps the overall space program win support and keep engineers interested in working on it as existing applications, like communications and remote sensing, become more routine.”

For Hoyt Davidson, a managing partner at commercial space investing company Near Earth, LLC, the economic benefits of projects like India’s Mars Orbiter will be valuable as a means of inspiration as well.

“In my humble opinion, what projects like India’s Mars Orbiter mean to a country’s economy has nothing to do with the actual dollars and cents, or in this case the rupees and paise, but the inspirational impact it has on students to study science, technology, engineering and math and the morale boost and general optimism such an audacious project can give to an emerging nation,” he said. ”Such confidence to innovate and achieve can spread positively through an economy. Becoming a major space faring nation means something and more countries seek such a status every year. Of course, a nation can also use those funds for more shovel ready projects, but then all you get are more citizens that know how to use shovels. What will be the key to success in this 21st century? More shoveling, hammering and paving? Or complex engineering, computer skills and scientific discovery?”

If India’s Mars Orbiter is successful, India will be only the fourth space agency to successfully send a probe to Mars, after the United States, Russia, and the European Space Agency. It also won’t be lonely – NASA’s Mars Orbiter, Maven, also launched earlier this month and is expected to arrive in Martian orbit about three days before India’s Mars Orbiter.




Source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/alexknapp/2013/12/01/indias-mars-orbiter-has-left-earth-and-is-headed-towards-mars/

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Re: Mars One

Post by Jan on Tue Dec 03, 2013 7:16 pm

Mars One Project, a one-way trip for four to Mars by 2023


Would you sign up for a trip to the Red Planet? That may be a very real option sometime soon: the Mars One Project wants to ship out a crew of four by 2023. How? By securing funds after "creating the biggest media event ever" surrounding the mission, and by sending waves of settlers to go live on Mars.

Even with so many details up in the air, Mars One has a pretty specific roadmap. Next year will see the selection of up to 40 astronauts from "everyone and anyone who feels they are up to the challenge." Then, said astronauts will live out in the desert together in a mock habitat as they prepare for the real thing. Think Mars500, but with less isolation.

In 2016, the first craft will be sent to Mars: a supply vehicle that will make the interplanetary journey in under 10 months and carry over 5,500 pounds of food (hopefully the thing has a refrigerator inside). In 2018, a robotic rover will follow, which will scout for the best possible area to establish a colony. This rover will also pipe a live video feed back to Earth — a concept Mars One leans heavily on, but more on that in a moment.

2021 is when things get real. A series of pod-like structures will be sent to the Red Planet: "two living units, two life support units, a second supplies unit and another rover in total." The rover will join the first scout, and together the pair will construct the preliminary habitat for a manned mission in 2023. 2022 will see "all water, oxygen and atmosphere production" squared away, and if everything checks out the first four human visitors to Mars will get the green.

For what's little more than a collection of concept renderings right now, it's an ambitious plan and one that starts soon. Mars One mastermind Bas Lansdorp, a Dutch businessman who used to work in alternative energy, hasn't quite outlined what this "biggest media event ever" will look like, but io9's Robert Gonzalez reports that "the project has already received backing from Paul Römer, a co-founder and executive producer of the show Big Brother." Hopefully that doesn't mean shallow drama or pillow talk captured in nightvision on the way to Mars.

It's an ambitious plan and one that's tickled our preliminary curiosity, but everything about the Mars One Project is exactly that: preliminary.


Source: http://www.dvice.com/archives/2012/06/mars_one_projec.php

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Re: Mars One

Post by Jan on Wed Dec 11, 2013 8:54 am

200,000 people apply to live on Mars


(CNN) -- If you have ambitions of being one of the first people on Mars, listen up: A Dutch company says it is moving along with its plan to send four lucky Earthlings to colonize the Red Planet. The catch: They won't ever come back.

The Mars One foundation announced Tuesday that it has secured lead suppliers for an unmanned mission launching in 2018, which involves a robotic lander and a communications satellite. Lockheed Martin has been contracted to study building the lander, and Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. will develop a concept study for the satellite, Mars One said.

This first mission will demonstrate technology that would be involved in a permanent human settlement on Mars. If all goes well -- and that's still very much an "if" -- the first pioneers could land on Mars in 2025.

Enthusiasm has been growing since the project's first big announcement in April. More than 200,000 people have signed up to be prospective astronauts, Mars One CEO Bas Lansdorp said in Washington on Tuesday.

Apparently, they're OK with living out the rest of their lives on Mars. The technology for a return flight doesn't exist -- there's no Kennedy Space Center launch pad over there! -- and having a one-way trip greatly reduces costs, the company has said.

The application period is now closed, and by the end of this year, the company plans to notify those special folk who made it to Round 2.
The unmanned mission is the "most important and most difficult step of actually getting humans to Mars," Lansdorp said.

It would also be the first privately funded planetary exploration mission.

"The opportunity to participate in that is just really exciting," said Ed Sedivy, a chief engineer at Lockheed Martin Space Systems.
Lansdorp expects that the majority of funding for the unmanned missions will come from sponsors and partners, not public contributions.


The cost of the lander and satellite will be something that the contracted companies will study, although Mars One has a ballpark figure in mind, Lansdorp said.

Mars Curiosity rover finds life-supporting chemicals

What they want to send in 2018

The lander will be based on the successful NASA Phoenix mission, Lansdorp said. The Mars One probe will feature a robotic arm carrying a camera that will shoot continuous video, as well as a water experiment that will demonstrate the production of liquid water on the surface of Mars.

"The highest priority is to actually have liquid water on Mars," he said.

This unmanned mission will also carry the winning projects from an experiment contest. There will be a worldwide university challenge giving teams the chance to propose tests to carry out on Mars.

These could be science experiments, of course, but Mars One is also interested in "fun" experiments. One of Lansdorp's visions, for instance, is a balloon with a camera attached to it that would film Mars from an altitude of 200 to 500 meters, which has never been done.

The communications satellite will provide live video feed from surface of Mars to Earth, representing the first Mars synchronous communications satellite, Lansdorp said.

Tourist trips to the Moon by 2043?

Getting to Mars

Mars One was originally slated to land the first humans in 2023, but the project has been delayed.

After the first humans arrive in 2025, the plan is send additional crews every two years, Lansdorp said. Right now, the idea is to send crews of four, but eventually bigger vehicles may become available to transport more people.

Is there enough time to get the lander and satellite on their way by 2018? Sedivy said it takes about 3½ years from commitment to initiating a preliminary design to launch, so that gives his company about a year of leeway to study this concept before promising to execute it.

That timeline is "pretty favorable," he said Tuesday. But as to whether it's enough time to develop the science side of things, that's "a little tricky," he said.

It takes money

Mars One is looking at "a range of funding scenarios." The total estimated budget for getting the first four humans to Mars is $6 billion. Lansdorp would not disclose how much money has been secured from partners and sponsors but said donations currently total more than $200,000.
A reality TV concept may help recoup costs. Lansdorp noted that Mars One will have the most unique video "available in the solar system," which has a lot of value, and he hopes this will attract sponsors and partners. Media coverage will be a main funding source.

But will the money come through? Will the technology really be developed by 2018 for the unmanned mission and to send people there by 2025? Will four humans survive the journey in a tight space capsule and embrace a desolate planet as their home?

As Lansdorp himself said Tuesday, "You can't go to Mars on excitement."

Time will tell whether prospective applicants can go at all.

Source: http://edition.cnn.com/2013/12/10/tech/innovation/mars-one-plan/index.html?sr=fb121013marsmission9p

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Re: Mars One

Post by Jan on Mon Apr 07, 2014 3:01 pm


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Re: Mars One

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